Tips for Being More Creative

If you’re a writer who waits for inspiration, you may find yourself waiting a long time. Consider using these tips to help you actively grab inspiration instead.

  • Observe everything around you. Include perceptions (yours and those of others), dreams and expectations, and information.
  • Give some thought to what drives you to write. Do you write in order to make money? To share a vision with others? To experiment with language? When you realize your motivation, you’ll concentrate on your writing better.
  • Work within the rules of the form you’re writing. There are formulas for genre fiction such as romance and mystery. There are rules for poetry. Your challenge is to write something new and creative while staying within the rules.
  • Test the limits of your writing ideas. For example, write about a character as seen through the eyes of the mail carrier. What type and quantity of mail does the character get? What perceptions form within the mail carrier’s mind about the person based on that mail? What you write may not be worthy of including in your story, but it will expand your creativity to see the character with new eyes. You can move ahead from there.
  • Learn to enjoy being alone with you. Set aside a place and time for writing. Remember Pavlov’s dog? You can condition yourself. When you go to your writing place, you automatically think writing. You know you can’t leave for, say, thirty minutes, so eventually something will come to mind and you’ll start writing during that time. It may not be what you expected, but at least you’re writing. My point is you have a lot inside of you that stays hidden unless you learn to enjoy being alone with you and give yourself permission to discover what’s within you.
  • Allow yourself to be patient. In our instant gratification world, we want things quick and now. But sometimes things take time to learn, to happen, to come to fruition.
  • Be confident. You know that you can write. Since writing is a craft (sorry to disappoint you if you thought it was just talent), the more you write, the better your writing gets. Consider this story. I tried out for sixth-grade band. I wanted to play drums, but back in those days, I was told girls don’t play drums–they played clarinet or flute. I chose clarinet but could never stop squeaking, no matter how much I sucked that reed or practiced. Since I played piano, I knew I had some musical ability. But instead of persisting, I gave up band the day I ended up in last chair behind a girl who didn’t even show up. How bad must I be when I’m deemed worse than a no-show? What I did learn, however, is that I didn’t lack confidence as much as I lacked desire. I didn’t want to play clarinet in the first place. Be honest with yourself about your writing and if you really want it, confidently practice it as much as you can.
  • Understand you get to destroy what you write. Some call that editing or rewriting, but I call it power. You don’t have to share anything you write until you think it’s ready to be shared.
  • Know that not everyone will like what you write and that’s okay. Not everyone likes gardening or eating fish. Just remember that most published writers have been rejected numerous times before being accepted. What makes the difference? The publisher who accepted the work liked it while the others didn’t. And that’s the real key. Publishers/readers/agents reject the writing, not the writer. They don’t reject you. They don’t even know you, so don’t take the rejection personal. If you get a rejection, simply say, “Next,” and send it out to the next market on your list. Just make sure your writing is your best effort when you do start sharing it and be willing to listen to any suggestions you may get along the way. It’s your writing, not theirs, but they may give you some ideas to make it better, so be open to considering what they say.

This post is longer than most, but creativity is a complex topic. I hope you find something here to help you lure inspiration to you rather than you wait for it to show up. Happy writing!

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