A New Use for an Old Tool

January 25, 2017

Storyboarding is an old tool used to arrange the flow of images in film. It involves time (what happens first, then second, then next, etc.) and provides an opportunity to imagine and evaluate ideas for the project.

How can you use storyboarding in your writing? Get some post-it notes or 3 x 5 index cards (whichever you prefer) and determine your working space. You can use a whiteboard or poster board for post-it notes or lay out index cards on any flat surface (floor, bed, table, etc.).

Jot one idea about your book per post-it or index card (example could be Jennie hears gunshot, peers out her window, and sees person look toward her). Write another idea on a different post-it or index card (example could be Jennie’s coworker asks her if she was home when the shooting occurred in her neighborhood). Write another idea on a different post-it or index card.

Don’t evaluate your ideas as you capture them. Wait until you’ve got a bunch of ideas¬† (let’s say, up to twenty), and then lay them out in sequence so you can begin to see your story unfold.

You’ll find gaps that need filling in. You’ll find scenes that need fleshing out. You’ll discover new things about your characters, and may even find some that don’t belong in your story at all. When you find things that don’t fit in this story,¬† save them to use in another one you’ll write.

As you work, you’ll get new ideas, which means you’ll create new post-its or index cards. As you do more research for your story, you’ll get even more new ideas to add to your story sequence. If you’re feeling overwhelmed with ideas, take another look at each idea and ask these two questions:

  1. Why does this belong in my book and why does it belong in this spot?
  2. Where else can I use this idea (think book series, short story, etc.)?

These two questions will help you decide what stays in your book and what will serve you better in a different story.

What do you do when you’re done with your storyboarding? Use the notes to help get you writing. For example, if you need an outline of what happens in each chapter, use your notes to help you create your outline. I caution you, however, to not spend so much time getting ready to write that you never actually get around to writing.

Consider this new use for an old tool and decide if you want to add it to your writing toolbox. Happy writing!

 

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How You Think Impacts How You Write

January 17, 2017

We’re two weeks into the new year, and it’s a good time to think about how we think. Why? Because our thinking impacts our writing.

Here are some things you might want to consider as you write this year.

  • Realize that people are your greatest resource and are available all around you. People write. People create. People examine. People research. We tend to look for people with common interests, common goals, common ideals. In other words, we like to hang out with people who validate us. How does staying in your comfort zone impact your writing? It helps you determine whether you’re challenging yourself enough.
  • Look for things in others that you don’t like. No one can be all things to you, yet relationships last for years. How can that be? When you discover something about another person you don’t like, try to figure out why you still work on your relationship with that person. How does that impact your writing? It helps you create more interesting characters and highlight differences in them.
  • Understand you can never change someone else. People change and they change every day, but they change when they want to, not because someone else wants them to. Look at your own life. You’ve made changes along the way, and you made them when you saw a benefit to making them. How does understanding that impact your writing? It helps you determine your writing schedule and goals. It helps you organize your writing and decide what to include and what to save for the next piece you write. It helps you motivate your characters or change story line.
  • Appreciate that people don’t like to be ordered around, but rather prefer to participate. Granted, there’s a place for authority and orders, but you get better commitment and “buy-in” when you invite or ask people to join you. How does this impact your writing? It can help you in your research, in your time commitments that take you away from writing, and even in your plot and characters.
  • Know that confrontation can be good. Conflict shows something isn’t right and needs attention. Can you think of any engaging story that doesn’t have confrontation or conflict of some type? That question should be enough to show you how conflict can help your writing.
  • Recognize that everything has a beginning and an ending. Today started and will end. This week started and will end. And so it goes with this month and this year. Your stories begin and end. Your activities begin and end. That’s not to say things don’t repeat, but each repetition differs a little from what occurred previously. How does recognizing beginning and endings help your writing? You can use beginnings and endings to map out chapters, character development, writing schedules, research options–everything!

I hope this list of ideas helps you keep up your writing for the new year. Remember, only you can write what you write because you are the only one who thinks exactly the way you do. Happy writing!